New and Hot
Origins of This Blog:

One evening whilst craving a flick, we stopped at our local Redbox looking for something "new and hot." It was this phrase that incapsulated what we were seeking, not only in movies, but in life. What was currently prevailing in our lives was "new and hot's" evil opposite "old and cold," and it's cruelly subtle cousin "lukewarm and mediocre." It is through this blog that we hope to teach you how to discern what's new and hot so you too can get WITH IT!
By, Mad, and Tals
New and Hot
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missbigdreams:

Window at Milwaukee’s abandoned insane asylum.
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kateoplis:

Weekend Plans
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visual-poetry:

»ugly« by david shrigley (+)
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kateoplis:

DosJotas
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bbook:

Agnès Varda Talks Media and Contemporary Life + Her Early Films in an Interview From the 1960s
bbook:

Agnès Varda Talks Media and Contemporary Life + Her Early Films in an Interview From the 1960s
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kateoplis:

How about never?
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ikaristwin:

Blow-Up (1966) dir. Michelangelo Antonioni
ikaristwin:

Blow-Up (1966) dir. Michelangelo Antonioni
ikaristwin:

Blow-Up (1966) dir. Michelangelo Antonioni
ikaristwin:

Blow-Up (1966) dir. Michelangelo Antonioni
ikaristwin:

Blow-Up (1966) dir. Michelangelo Antonioni
ikaristwin:

Blow-Up (1966) dir. Michelangelo Antonioni
ikaristwin:

Blow-Up (1966) dir. Michelangelo Antonioni
ikaristwin:

Blow-Up (1966) dir. Michelangelo Antonioni
ikaristwin:

Blow-Up (1966) dir. Michelangelo Antonioni
ikaristwin:

Blow-Up (1966) dir. Michelangelo Antonioni
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tresvampiros:

Wait a minute…
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kenkofoto:

I shot this building for the first time when I was in film school at UWM. I loved old Soviet films and design, and this building looked like a ship made by Constructivists. I remember proudly turning in my black and white student film to my instructor, full of pans and tilts of the lines of the building, His reaction was “so what?”. He wanted to know what it meant.
I was at a loss for words, because my film was about a feeling for this building, and he was right to challenge me. I’ll never forget that lesson — the “so what?” of everything. Every photo I take has a “so what?” in it, and some of them I don’t have to explain.